12 January 2006

AHA Acquisitions, etc.

One of the best things about the AHA is the Book Exhibit. Ideally, I think one should attend the Book Exhibit twice. The first time should be on Friday or Saturday. You wander up and down the aisles, scoping out the books and remembering which ones you would like to get. You also visit presses, and talk with editors in serious tones about Your Project. You give your card out to all an sundry. The second time should be mid-morning Sunday, when presses are packing up and, desperate to get rid of their stock so they don't have to ship it back, will sell hardcover books at astonishingly low prices. Bring a large bag and a wad of cash, and have at it.

Thomas A. Desjardin, Into the Howling Wilderness: Benedict Arnold's March to Quebec in 1775 (2005). I have a long-standing interest in Arnold's March, since I wrote my senior thesis about it. But alas, the index does not include references to my hero, William Dorr, and the bibliography does not mention the thesis of one Rebecca Goetz. Shoot.

Helen C. Rountree, Powhatan, Pocahontas, Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown (2005). Continuing my interest in all things 2007, especially scholarly treatments of Pocahontas. In similar news, The New World movie will be out January 20th. That will be a post, I have no doubt.

2 Comments:

At Thursday, January 12, 2006 8:37:00 PM, Blogger Sluggo said...

I'm looking forward to the New World as well, but 16th century exploration and conquest were not PG-13 affairs.

Any mention in Desjardins of Joel Loveland (Loveman), of Captain Handchet's Co.?

Can I get a copy of your thesis through my local university library system? or any other way you might know of? hmmmm???

 
At Sunday, January 15, 2006 12:13:00 AM, Blogger Rebecca said...

Well, there's no Loveland or Loveman, but there is a mention of a soldier named Love (given thirty-three lashes for theft and drummed out of the army).

I really don't think you'd find my juvenalia at all useful. But there is a copy on deposit at the Massachusetts Historical Society. :)

 

Post a Comment

<< Home